Wednesday, May 05, 2021

Title: Gastric Sleeves vs Gastric Bands: Which Is More Effective?


People who are morbidly obese are at an increased risk of developing a variety of conditions, including heart disease, diabetes, depression, infertility, and various cancer types. For some, bariatric surgery is an effective tool in minimizing these risks, helping the patient to reach their fitness goals and improve their health.

Bariatric surgery can be an effective weight loss aid, helping the patient feel more confident about their appearance, boosting their psychological wellbeing and quality of life as well as their physical health. While many individuals worry that the weight will eventually return, studies suggest that most people who undergo bariatric surgery not only lose weight, but keep it off for good.

Gastric band and gastric sleeve procedures are both common types of bariatric surgery. Here, we look at the main differences between the two, exploring the benefits and risks associated with each.

Gastric Sleeve Surgery

Prior to undergoing a gastric sleeve procedure, the patient typically meets with their surgeon, as well as a dietitian. The surgery’s success is heavily reliant on the patient making lasting dietary and lifestyle changes. Even before the operation, they may need to lose weight for the procedure, proving they have the discipline required to adhere to the requirements afterwards.

The gastric sleeve procedure itself generally takes approximately three hours to complete. The patient receives a general anesthetic while the surgery is carried out laparoscopically, i.e., via keyhole surgery.

During a gastric sleeve procedure, also known as a sleeve gastrectomy, between 70 percent and 85 percent of the stomach is removed. The surgeon makes several small incisions in the patient’s abdomen, inserting a tube fitted with a small camera, called a laparoscope, into one incision, feeding other small instruments into the other incisions to remove part of the stomach.

Following a successful sleeve gastrectomy, the patient is left with a tube-shaped stomach, which the surgeon seals with staples. Once the surgery is complete, the patient is transferred to the recovery area, where clinicians will monitor their heart rate and blood pressure, administering pain medication. The patient may have a catheter fitted, as well as small drains in the wounds to allow excess fluid to escape. These are removed before the patient goes home.

An individual who has undergone gastric sleeve surgery will not be able to drive themselves home from the hospital. They will need to maintain a liquid diet for several weeks, eventually progressing to moist, soft foods. It may take up to six weeks before the patient can eat solid food following a sleeve gastrectomy.

Gastric sleeve surgery permanently changes the amount a patient can eat and the way that they eat it. They will need ongoing clinical support. In some circumstances, gastric sleeve surgery can be a life-changing, and even life-saving intervention, but it is not a quick fix by any means. Since a sleeve gastrectomy involves removal of a significant portion of the stomach, it is irreversible.

Gastric Band Surgery

This procedure requires placement of an adjustable silicone band around the upper region of the patient’s stomach. This helps them to feel full sooner, encouraging them to eat less, which promotes weight loss.

As with gastric sleeve surgery, gastric banding is carried out under general anesthetic. The procedure typically takes between 1-2 hours. Here too, surgeons use a keyhole technique, making several incisions, using a laparoscope to see what they are doing.

The patient typically leaves the hospital the day after a gastric band procedure. As with a sleeve gastrectomy, for the first few weeks, they consume only liquids, progressing to soft then solid food over the course of a few weeks.

Gastric banding is an effective weight loss treatment, helping most individuals to lose at least half of their excess bodyweight. The chief difference between gastric sleeve surgery and gastric banding is that, with the latter, no part of the patient’s stomach is removed. A band is simply placed around the upper stomach, creating a pouch.

Which is Better?

Gastric sleeve surgery involves removing part of the stomach, whereas a gastric band procedure leaves the organ intact. Gastric sleeve surgery is therefore much more invasive, and more complex, requiring a much longer operation.

While gastric banding is reversible, a sleeve gastrectomy is not. With a gastric sleeve, the risk of serious complications is also higher than with a gastric band. In addition, some individuals who have undergone a sleeve gastrectomy report heartburn or reflux problems afterwards, whereas a gastric band usually reduces these symptoms.

Neither a gastric sleeve nor a gastric band is an instant fix for obesity. Both surgeries require significant sacrifices from patients in terms of permanently changing their lifestyles and eating habits. Any form of surgery incurs risk. Nevertheless, in terms of reducing the risk and severity of obesity-related conditions, with both gastric sleeve surgery and gastric banding, the benefits typically outweigh the risks.

This is a guest blog entry.

No comments:

Post a Comment

Your comments are welcome.