Wednesday, October 20, 2021

What to Expect From an Assisted Living Facility

Assisted living facilities provide numerous benefits to elderly residents in terms of care and well-being. With nearly 30,000 of these facilities in the US, there are many options to choose from. If you or someone you love wants to learn more about these special types of homes, the information below can help.

Services

For those who are unfamiliar with assisted living, it’s worth knowing that these facilities provide numerous services that go just beyond the basics. Along with comfortable, private accommodation and home-cooked meals, many assisted living homes also offer the following services:

  • Medication management (typically administered by onsite medical staff)
  • Assistance with grooming/bathing/toileting
  • Help with dressing/undressing
  • Transferring (e.g., from bed to chair to wheelchair)
  • Laundry
  • Weekly housekeeping
  • Pet care
  • Scheduling medical appointments
  • Social and recreational activities (e.g., yoga, movie nights, Bingo games, arts/crafts)

Levels of Care

Another thing to bear in mind when it comes to assisted living facilities is that they often provide multiple levels of care. These range from lower to higher to memory care.

Lower Levels

As the word implies, lower levels of care are for residents who require minimal assistance or support. These individuals are fairly independent and are physically able to take care of daily hygiene needs. Lower-level care may involve some assistance such as help with medication, showering, or getting their clothes on; however, they don’t require intensive medical monitoring.

Higher Levels

Higher levels of care are for residents who require more physical assistance from the caregivers at the facility. For example, individuals who require help walking and/or transferring from one place to another are often given higher levels of care. These individuals may also be at a more advanced stage of memory loss or cognitive decline and will require help with bathing, dressing, and managing their daily hygiene. They also tend to require intensive medical monitoring.

Memory Care

Memory care is a higher level of care that is designed for individuals with dementia or Alzheimer’s Disease. Residents requiring memory care are often in the advanced stages of memory loss, and they are provided with customized support for their illness. Staff members are also specially trained in dementia care. The emphasis in memory care is to maintain the support and dignity of the clients and assist the family members where possible. Facilities such as Clifton Woods in Silver Spring also offer Alzheimer’s care activities such as daily exercise, puzzles, and art projects.

Community

Another beneficial feature of assisted living facilities is the sense of community. Not only do these homes enable and promote socializing, but they also provide recreational programs and services that bring the residents together. While facilities can differ from state to state and across cities, most homes aim to encourage independence and treat their residents with the utmost dignity and respect. 

Costs

Assisted living costs vary from one center to the next in terms of amenities, size, privacy, and levels of care. While it’s difficult to provide exact costs, the national median rates for these facilities can be around $4,000 per month. This might seem exorbitant at first, but it tends to be less expensive than nursing care and private home health care.

This is a guest blog entry.

Friday, October 15, 2021

What does someone with PTSD act like?


Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a psychiatric disorder that is often triggered by experiencing or witnessing a horrible event such as sexual violence, a natural disaster, serious injury, war, or being threatened with death. Many people with PTSD have difficulty coping with their feelings and intrusive symptoms, such as uncontrollable thoughts about the event.


Fortunately, with the help of a therapist who is trained in counseling PTSD patients and medical therapies, people with PTSD can get better.

PTSD not only affects the sufferer but the people in their lives, such as friends, family members, and coworkers.  Loved ones may also have difficulty understanding how to help or support someone with PTSD.

The symptoms of PTSD often interfere with the person’s day-to-day functioning. Most often, the person living with PTSD will exhibit:


●    Being panicking when reminded of the trauma
●    Angry reactions that seem to come on suddenly
●    Extreme alertness, or 'hypervigilance'
●    Lack of sleep or sleep disturbances
●    Irritability
●    Emotional distance in relationships
●    Aggressive behavior
●    Being more easily startled
●    Avoidance of places, people, and situations
●    Auditory and visual hallucinations
●    Memory issues
●    Difficulty concentrating
●    Inability to articulate


PTSD Can Be Different For Everyone


There are a number of human emotions and responses to traumatic situations based on a person’s upbringing and culture. How a person responds to a traumatic event also depends on what the event was. A veteran who has fought for their country may be triggered by different stimuli than a person who develops PTSD after a catastrophic earthquake.

A person suffering from this disorder may deny that they have PTSD and not seek therapy for years. Thus, they turn to unhealthy coping mechanisms. Some coping mechanisms, such as working out or dedicating oneself to school or work, may be mistaken by loved ones as “being back to normal” and may not consider such obsessions a sign of PTSD. Because such qualities are often mistaken as “positive” traits, it can delay a person recognizing their PTSD and thus delay their treatment.

However, PTSD could look different for another individual. Rather than being overly hard-working and articulate, they may have difficulty keeping track of work, bills, their finances, and their families. They may become more forgetful, avoid friends and loved ones out of embarrassment, and seem more distant even when around them.


There Is Hope


The American Psychiatric Association (APA) added PTSD to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-III) in 1980, paving a new way for the identification and treatment of sufferers. Since its inclusion in the DSM, millions of patients, from sexual assault survivors to veterans, have been able to successfully seek help for their symptoms and move forward with their lives.

The PTSD Group, which is led by a double board-certified pain management/physical medicine and rehabilitation physician, and a board-certified emergency room physician, say that if a person gets help right away with the right therapies, they recover within a matter of weeks or months. People living with PTSD have medical options available to them in addition to talk therapy, such as stellate ganglion block (SGB) treatment. If you or a loved one are suffering from PTSD, then it’s worth it to yourself and your future to learn more about these life-changing therapies.
 

This is a guest blog entry.

Can My Employer Legally Terminate Me While Out On Disability?

If your employer fires you while you are on disability, this is called wrongful termination. There are several acts in place that guard you against retaliation and protect your rights. You can depend on the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), the California Family Rights Act & Job Protection (CFRA), and the Family & Medical Leave Act (FMLA) to prevent this from happening without repercussions.

Can I Be Legally Terminated While Disabled?


Sometimes your employer may act unreasonably and no longer want you as an employee because you were gone too long. However, retaliation is illegal and against federal policy.

ADA Laws


If you are terminated, it cannot be due to a disability. This includes anyone on disability leave and even after you return to work after your hiatus. If your company has more than 15 employees, then these laws are in effect. Your employer is required to create reasonable accommodations to help aid you despite your disability. This is as long as it doesn’t cause your employer undue hardship. You have to inform your employer of the accommodations that you need.

FMLA Laws


You cannot be terminated from your position if you do not go over the maximum of 12 weeks’ leave. FMLA was created to provide unpaid leave when you have a medical issue. This is also the case if a family member has fallen ill and you have to take care of them. This law does not protect all workplaces. The company must have a minimum of 50 employees and be in the range of 75 miles of your home. You also have to be at that job for more than one year or at a minimum of 1,250 hours.

CFRA Laws


According to these state laws, you can receive up to 12 weeks of leave within one year. This is to take care of a child, yourself, or if a family member becomes ill. However, if this time has to include vacation time, you have to be paid time off. You should be reinstated to the same position you were in before you left. Being terminated while on leave for a child or family member means that they are breaking laws.

If Your Employer Violated a Law, Take Action


When you believe you were wrongfully terminated, you should speak with an attorney to represent your case. This is because you cannot collect unemployment while on disability. If you are unable to perform job duties, you are deemed ineligible for unemployment compensation. During a challenging situation like this, a legal advisor can help prevent you from being stuck with no job or any income. In addition, your lawyer can investigate whether you were lawfully following the rules of your medical or disability leave and whether or not you should take action. A lot of attorneys provide free consultation and don’t require a fee unless they win the case.

Get Additional Help if You’ve Been Terminated


You can learn more about how disability attorneys can represent you as they work towards protecting the disabled or wrongfully terminated. In addition, you can visit our website, click Ghitterman, to read more about how to improve your circumstances. A disability shouldn’t prevent you from living your life and staying financially stable.

https://ca.db101.org/ca/situations/workandbenefits/rights/program2c.htm
https://www.hrw.org/topic/disability-rights?gclid=CjwKCAjw_o-HBhAsEiwANqYhp6aKoJ28I8NaNw--HLjKTascJREdg4vJRANNFSQlaGnQ4AP0UZ9HQhoC0CsQAvD_BwE


https://pixabay.com/photos/overwhelmed-stressed-out-burned-out-4592797/

This is a guest blog entry.