Tuesday, January 19, 2021

Why do New Year’s diets fail?


Every January there is a massive influx of diet culture and New Year’s resolution diet based media. It could be gym based, how sleep affects your weight, Veganuary, or just a good old “cut out carbs” based diet.

On one hand, January can be the perfect time to start introducing healthy new habits; everyone loves the feeling of a fresh new year, a brand-new page. Just like the first page of a notebook. It can give you the boost you need in order to kick start the year in the right way, chances are you’ve eaten and drunk your fill over Christmas, so your body might be craving veggies.

Veganuary is also becoming bigger
every year, originating in 2014, it’s the trend where you try becoming Vegan for the month of January. Due to its impact, both supermarkets and restaurants have been known to run promotional adverts to coincide with the movement.  

According to the Statistic Brain Research Institute “weight loss” was the second most popular New Year’s resolution in 2017, with only 9.2% then feeling successful in achieving this.  One of the main factors stopping people from succeeding is purely that they get too hyped up about it at the beginning and set themselves unrealistic expectations.

Old habits do tend to die hard. If you’ve been eating a lot of chocolate every day for an extended period of time, then stopping immediately, especially just after Christmas because it can be a bit of a shock for your body. It can also trigger you if you’re an emotional or stress eater. You suddenly feel like you can’t do something which has been bringing you happiness, therefore you’re more likely to then binge. Try just reducing the amount you eat on a daily basis so you can still feel like you’re in control.

Another problem with a new diet resolution is the word itself. “Resolution” is such a demanding word. It creates such an inflexible idea of what you need to do in order to achieve success. Automatically making you feel that if you slip up once then you have failed and may as well give up.

A different method of approach can be to change one thing in your diet, say rather than doing Veganuary and making it your whole month, alter it to Meat Free Monday. This way, you can make more sustainable changes within your life. Also, probably carry it on for longer, rather than just shocking your body one month, you’re making more sustainable changes that with benefit your health in a much more long term fashion.

Adopting a new habit can be an effective way to aid your weight loss, if that’s your aim.  Rather than cutting something out and feeling like you’re missing out on something, adding something into your daily life can have the same affect and make you feel better. For example, making sure you get your 10,000 steps in every day can increase your calorie output, especially if you work a desk job.

This is a guest blog entry.

Saturday, January 16, 2021

The Basics to Taking Good Care of Your Teeth

Our mouths are living organisms that need looking after, from our gums to our teeth and our tongues. Despite dental care being an essential part of our daily hygiene routine, most people fail to take proper care of their teeth. This is mainly because they don’t have a solid understanding of the subject. We hope to change that with our article today. Read on to find out all the basics to taking good care of your teeth.
 

Brushing Your Teeth


First things first, let’s talk about brushing our teeth. We should brush our teeth at least twice a day, every day – without exception. It’s important to use a fluoride toothpaste when doing so, and not to spit the toothpaste out after finishing. This is because the fluoride provides a protective covering for our teeth. Rinsing after spitting means that all this gets washed away. Furthermore, when brushing our teeth, we should use small circular motions, plus back-and-forth strokes. Don’t forget about the gums, either! Lightly bring your toothbrush around these areas because food can sometimes accumulate here. We also suggest gently brushing your tongue (or using a tongue scraper) to help your mouth stay clean and ensure your tongue is healthy. Finally, make sure to change your toothbrush’s head every 3 to 4 months because, otherwise, it will become ineffective and unhygienic.


Insert Image Here: https://pixabay.com/illustrations/tooth-dental-care-white-white-teeth-2414909/ Image Source: Pixabay.com.


Flossing Your Teeth


Most people will proudly announce that they don’t floss their teeth, and they haven’t had any problems. This is because you can’t see the damage that is done until it’s too late. Flossing removes the plaque from in between your teeth which a toothbrush can’t reach. If this plaque is allowed to fester, it will eventually cause tooth decay and gum disease. These are painful, serious dental issues that can lead to further complications down the line. As such, everyone needs to floss at least once every day. You can either use tooth floss or interdental brushes for this. Gently slip your flossing tool of choice between your teeth, then use strokes which go side-to-side, up-and-down. This should dislodge any plaque which is lodged between the teeth.


Visit Your Dentist


As well as staying on top of your dental hygiene, it’s also important to regularly visit your dentist. They will be able to identify any problems you might have missed when cleaning and then provide treatment. No matter how brilliant you think your dental hygiene is, this step cannot be missed. Head online and search for a specialist in your area, like this dentist in Plymouth for example. This is the best way to ensure your teeth are top-notch. Also, your dentist can provide you with expert advice on your specific dental needs. For instance, they will be able to tell you how your diet is affecting your teeth. If you don’t realize you are drinking or consuming too much sugar, they will highlight this, so you know to cut down.


These are the basics of taking good care of your teeth. Remember to always stay on top of your dental hygiene routine!

This is a guest blog posting.